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NaNoWriMo

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Writing is a passion that many have taken up. Just go to the library and marvel at the hundreds or thousands of names emblazoned proudly on the covers of books. Many hopeful authors unpublished, hope for the chance to make their book one day sit on the top of the New York Bestselling list. NaNoWriMo is one of the many programs that could help someone achieve their dream of writing, with a computer and a keyboard.

NaNoWriMo stands for National Novel Writing Month. NaNoWriMo takes place during November, which is the National Novel Writing Month. To participate, participants sign up for free, set a word goal before November (as far back as September), and start planning their novel. 2 months may sound like a long time to plan a novel, but for a full-length, in-depth novel, sometimes 2 months may not even be enough. Forums are open to consulting fellow Wrimos (NaNo slang for other participants) on things such as names, plot holes, and character development. However, the real fun begins in November.

By the time November 1st arrives, Wrimos have their fingers at the ready to type. Why the urgency? Well, the real challenge of NaNoWriMo is to finish one’s novel, or at least their chosen word goal. 50,000 is average chosen word goal, in 30 days, aka the month of November. That means writing more than 1,000 words a day. It certainly isn’t a piece of cake.

Once NaNoWriMo is over, writers take a small break, usually the month of December, before returning into the Now What? months, or January, February, and March. During these months, Wrimos go through the revising process. They rewrite, rewrite, and rewrite again for good measure. Of course, Wrimos don’t just wait for the next November to show themselves. NaNoWriMo has a side program, called Camp NaNoWriMo. Essentially, it’s NaNoWriMo except during the summer in July.

NaNoWriMo was originally meant as an adult program. The demand for a children’s one was so great that NaNoWriMo YWP was created. Standing for Young Writers Program, the YWP was aimed towards anyone under 18-years-old. A special feature was classrooms. These were like small writing groups with a teacher and students. Classroom materials were created as manuals on planning, writing, and revising your novel for all grade levels. The forums on there are more closely moderated with the minimum age 13.

Although NaNoWriMo had started out as just a writing program, it evolved into a community. It has its own inside jokes, memes, lore, and games. The program helps people make their stories come true, adults or kids. Most of all, it’s free and non-profit.

 

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