Giant Spider Webs Cover Greek Beach

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Giant Spider Webs Cover Greek Beach

Trees covered in spider webs

Trees covered in spider webs

via Flickr

Trees covered in spider webs

via Flickr

via Flickr

Trees covered in spider webs

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Halloween decorators all around the world should take inspiration from this bizarre natural phenomenon. In the northern area of Greece’s Lake Vistonida, people were shocked to find that the entire beach was covered in spider webs, painting the landscape in an eerie gray. Scientists blame it on the abnormally warm weather, which attracts high concentrations of insects such as mosquitoes and gnats. With such an abundance of food, the spiders were able to quickly overpopulate the area, and therefore coat the beach in their webs.

The spiders responsible for this infestation were the Tetragnatha, also known as stretch spiders because of their long bodies. Tetragnatha are special because they are light enough to be able to move on water faster than they move on land. Biologists observing the strange occurrence say that the spiders pose no actual threat humans living in the area, and did no actual damage to the infrastructure or vegetation and that once the spiders eventually died off, the webs would naturally degrade, leaving the area as it was before.

Natural phenomenon like this has been recorded around the world many times since the beginning of mankind. This incident specifically has been seen once before in 2003 in the same region. Natural phenomenon come in a wide range of forms. In earlier times they were often confused with witchcraft or messages from the gods. Today most phenomenon can be explained with simple science, yet some still go unsolved. Some of the strangest examples of natural phenomenon are Volcanic Lightning and the Turkmenistan Gateway to Hell. Volcanic lightning is caused when the ash from a volcanic explosion picks up so much static electricity it creates actual lightning. The Gateway to Hell, however, has no definite explanation. In 1971 petroleum scientists lit a fire in the Karakum Desert. To this day the fire is still burning despite never being reignited in any way.

Natural Phenomenon have been seen all around the world and many examples still cannot be explained.

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