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Hurricane Florence

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Hurricane Florence Relief Aid

Hurricane Florence Relief Aid

via the Army

via the Army

Hurricane Florence Relief Aid

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Over the past few weeks, Hurricane Florence made landfall at North Carolina on September 14, causing massive damage and long-term flooding, killing over 47 people. The storm was moving at 6 mph with 90 mph winds. This means that the damage was worse since the storm is slowly coming and going. The conditions were extreme flooding and extremely windy, causing massive damage to the Carolinas.

On September 15, the storm slowed down to 2 mph, affecting the Carolinas for days. Governor Cooper had warned everyone that mudslides can happen at night. More than 2,000 people were saved from the rising flood and over 20,000 people from both North and South Carolina evacuated to Red Cross evacuation shelters as Hurricane Florence is expected to affect South Carolina. Advisories from the National Hurricane Center had reported that there can be over 40 inches of rain in some parts of the Carolinas. Florence had taken out power for over 400,000 people and energy providers state power restoration will take weeks due to the amount of damage caused by the hurricane.

It is estimated that Hurricane Florence will drop an estimated amount of 18 trillion gallons of water onto South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia, Georgia, Tennessee, Kentucky, and Maryland, enough to fill up the Chesapeake Bay. In the town of New Bern, over 100 people were trapped since they lived right next to the Neuse River when it flooded. Even though Florence wind speeds downgraded to a tropical storm, many people were injured from falling, branches, and floods that are still happening. Water from affected rivers are still flooding communities and trapping them today.

The government is worried about contamination affecting the water, making it unsafe to drink for people. Workers are on alert for calls reporting about oil spills. The Environmental Protection Agency identified 41 Superfund sites in parts of the Carolinas that are being at risk of being flooded. Superfund sites are the most highly contaminated areas with toxic wastes and polluted dirt, which could spread disease to people. Governors of the Carolinas and President Donald Trump says this is a test of our teamwork skills to work together and prevent as much damage as possible. Governor Cooper warned people to get out of their cars when they see water rising up to prevent them from getting stuck in the middle of the road, making emergency vehicles have more delay due to cars blocking the way. Even though Hurricane Florence is still taking effect today, people are recovering and trying to prevent as much damage as possible from the effects of Florence.

 

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Hurricane Florence