Simon Cowell Introduces UK-pop

simon be like: bruh moment (cause his show has low ratings)

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simon be like: bruh moment (cause his show has low ratings)

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In February of 2019, Simon Cowell announced that there would be no X Factor this year. As a replacement, they would create two series of X Factor this year: X Factor: Celebrity and X Factor: The Band.

Due to poor ratings, X Factor was considered for removal from ITV’s autumn schedule in 2020 after 16 years unless a new contract was signed. The decision was to either stop airing the whole brand or give it a reduced run next year. Simon decided to change the format of the two series this year and he thinks, “It’s going to be huge.” It is unknown if the original format of X Factor will be used in future shows.

The X Factor series this year aren’t doing great as Simon hoped. X Factor: Celebrity has earned the lowest rating out of all the spinoffs of X Factor. The show peaked at 3.8 million figures but has since fallen down to 2.8 million with 800,000 people losing interest in the show. Simon has tried to draw viewers in by commenting the show was trending on Twitter.

There were plans to air X Factor All Stars which planned to be similar to Britain’s Got Talent: The Champions staring finalists and winners from previous X Factor shows. However, plans were abandoned due to Cowell struggling to get former stars to participate again.

Simon will try to yet again reinvent the singing competition through a show called X Factor: The Band.  The show focuses on forming a boy or girl group by the end of the show and is being rushed to air around the beginning of 2020 to compete against a similar show from BBC called The Search that features Little Mix. When Simon filmed a video made to inform about audition deadlines, he finished with “Right now, K-pop, you could argue, is ruling the world. Now it’s time for UK-pop.”

K-pop made its breakthrough with a quintet named Wonder Girls on the Halloween of 2009. Since then, K-pop has become a $5 billion industry. It is thought that Simon’s idea of UK-pop is to copy the aesthetic and dance moves that K-pop has but the difference would be that the groups are British instead of Korean. 

Obviously, K-pop fans weren’t happy with the decision, and took to social media saying that Simon’s plans were xenophobic and that there was already UK-pop. Although they aren’t labeled as UK-pop groups such as The Beatles, Spice Girls, One Direction, and Little Mix are UK-pop as they formed in the United Kingdom.

Despite Simon Cowell’s attempts to keep his X Factor brand alive, views have been declining even with the new series this year. After being a staple of entertainment on fall Saturday nights, it may be time for the brand to stop airing.