Democrats take Control of the House

Capitol Hill

via Wikimedia Commons

Capitol Hill

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The results from the U.S. midterms are in, and while the Republicans gained further control of the Senate, the Democrats took control of the House, a major setback for President Trump, as both the Senate and the House of Representatives must agree on any legislative decisions. Furthermore, this also means the Democrats will be able to launch constant investigations on President Trump. Despite this, Trump announced on Twitter that he considered the mid-terms a victory.

This is, in fact, a very rare event. For the past 105 years, a president has never been able to gain more seats in the Senate during midterms, but at the same time lose control of the House. The only time this has ever happened was 1970, 1962, and 1914. Republicans lost at least 27 seats in the House, and Democrats won 33. The midterms also made history in several other ways. Sharice Davids and Deb Haaland, both Democrats, became the first Native American women elected to Congress. Congress also received its first two Muslim women, and the first woman in her 20s to win a seat.

What most Trump supporters are worrying is that this change would allow the Democrats to investigate both Trump and his administration, most notably about the Russia investigation after the elections. Trump responded to this threat by saying “two can play at that game”, and threatened to investigate the Democrats on leaked classified information and other concerns. However, the biggest problem is the hold this could put on President Trump’s plans. By controlling the Senate, Trump will still be able to easily appoint judges and make changes to the Judicial branch. But as it goes for his other plans, this could be a serious problem.

Republicans had little to fear when it came to protecting their place in the Senate. They had to defend only nine seats, far less than the 26 seats that the Democrats had to defend. Republicans also only faced a true threat in the states of Nevada, Arizona, and strangely, Texas. Texas has been a “red state” since 1998, but Ted Cruz, Texas’s current Senator, has been unpopular. He still managed to win against his Democratic opponent Beto O’Rourke, if only by a small number of votes.

The midterms ended far different than most people expected. While the Republicans lost the House, a setback for President Donald Trump, they also gained even more control of the Senate. The midterms also made history, not only with the first Muslim and Native American Women to be elected to Congress but also with the victory over the Senate by the Republicans.

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